Untitled: (a Search for the Ghosts in the Meat Machine)

 

What does it mean to be human? At first glance a simple question, the idea of being human is an unstable construct, continuously recrafted.

Recent technological innovations allow us to redesign ourselves profoundly— from networked prosthetics and artificial intelligence, to the genetic code of life itself. Can our behaviors be reduced to algorithms? Can our bodies be upgraded with nonorganic integrations? Can sentience itself by manufactured in a lab?

This set of nine sculptures examines personhood from anatomical, psychological, genetic, biochemical, behavioral, algorithmic, personal narrative and memory. In many ways, this installation is an emotional confrontation with being quantifiable.

 Each sculpture is the artist’s height, and each glass vitrine holds the artist’s liquid volume.

Each sculpture is the artist’s height, and each glass vitrine holds the artist’s liquid volume.

 3d print of the connective network between the two halves of the artist’s brain from an anatomical scan of her brain, suspended with two capsules containing wifi and cellular antennas

3d print of the connective network between the two halves of the artist’s brain from an anatomical scan of her brain, suspended with two capsules containing wifi and cellular antennas

 3d print of circular DNA, jewelry box, silicone and glass

3d print of circular DNA, jewelry box, silicone and glass

 Screen submerged in a non-conductive fluid, flashing at 40hz, with two bands of EEG data recorded from the artist’s brain while she learned about brains

Screen submerged in a non-conductive fluid, flashing at 40hz, with two bands of EEG data recorded from the artist’s brain while she learned about brains

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This project was generously funded by the Biological Art and Design Awards, with scientific guidance from Professor Mario Maas, Matthias Cabri, and Onno Baur from the Department of Radiology & Nuclear Medicine of Amsterdam UMC.